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Articles by Henry Elkins

About Henry Elkins

A keen researcher of family ancestors, Henry will be reporting on the centenary of World War One. More Posts

For those who fell

No apologies for my post today – a special Remembrance Sunday because it marks the centenary of the ending of the First Word War – and I wish to begin by paying a small tribute to those who ply their trade in the UK media, both the Fleet Street and radio/television varieties. The press [...]

November 11, 2018 // 0 Comments

Poppy issues

Next weekend – I presume entirely by coincidence – the key Sunday’s UK Remembrance Day commemorations will take place on the eleventh hour of the eleventh month and mark the centenary of the symbolic official end of the First World War. It all seems very fitting. In recent years there have [...]

November 7, 2018 // 0 Comments

A WW1 landmark makes the news

Three and a half years ago now – travelling with a small group in the area of the Somme – my brother and I made a significant breakthrough on a little project we had given ourselves to try and discover the final resting places of two Allied airmen who had been downed upon a reconnaissance [...]

November 2, 2018 // 0 Comments

The never-ending quest

It is a truism to state that our planet the Earth is a wondrous thing. Never mind all the life-threatening 21st Century issues – climate change, deforestation, ongoing destruction of natural habitats, the finite aspect of fossil fuel and other resources, population growth, geopolitical anarchy, [...]

October 26, 2018 // 0 Comments

The Sandham Chapel

Yesterday in the company of Alice Mansfield and Douglas Heath I visited the Stanley Spencer chapel in Burghclere, Newbury. For a number of reasons I was underwhelmed. First the chapel itself seems more a modern crematorium more than a spiritual place. Second, it had a rather confused gestation. The [...]

October 25, 2018 // 0 Comments

Marking the Centenary

The the centenary next month of the end of the conflict sometimes described by those alive at the time and/or both shortly afterwards as ‘the war to end all wars’ – and otherwise generally known as either ‘The Great War’ or ‘First World War’ – is [...]

October 20, 2018 // 0 Comments

Paris Echo/Sebastian Faulks

Sebastian Faulks’ Birdsong made a huge impression on me as a First World War novel. It was well researched, moving, with a powerful story. I have never found his subsequent novels matched this. He is nonetheless an author with a wide and loyal readership up there with Julian Barnes and Ian [...]

October 2, 2018 // 0 Comments

Aiming off …

Earlier this week I went to a showing of the new ‘feature’ documentary Spitfire, made by Altitude Films, produced by Mark Stuart and directed by David Fairhead and Ant Palmer, in a small art-house style cinema screening at Chichester in West Sussex. As a small boy in the 1950s and beyond I [...]

August 24, 2018 // 0 Comments

To 1944 and back

This may sound a degree absurd from someone in their sixties with a general interest in military history but last week I made my first-ever research trip to Normandy as a member of a small touring group spending five days ‘doing’ the D-Day Landings and elements of the 1944 Allied campaign to [...]

July 8, 2018 // 0 Comments

France :A History from Gaul to de Gaulle / John Julius Norwich

I always have a lot of respect for writers of non fiction whose preparation involves a lot of research and who can nonetheless produce a final work that is concise. Norman Stone wrote a brilliant short history of the First World War, Neal McGregor a superb but short history of Germany and now John [...]

July 3, 2018 // 0 Comments

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