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Bateman House, Burwash

On what may well be the last hot day of this glorious summer extending into autumn, I was delighted to be visiting yesterday Bateman’s, the home of Rudyard Kipling, just east of Lewes which he bought in 1902 for £9,300 which came with 33 acres. At the height of his popularity and fame Kipling [...]

October 11, 2018 // 0 Comments

An early ending

At what stage does a disgruntled reader give up on his/her book? It’s an issue that troubles many a book club. Some have rules that provided the member gives a cogent reason he/she can give up. I was guest at one where Saul Bellow novel The Adventures of Argie March was “set”. At least half [...]

October 9, 2018 // 0 Comments

Paris Echo/Sebastian Faulks

Sebastian Faulks’ Birdsong made a huge impression on me as a First World War novel. It was well researched, moving, with a powerful story. I have never found his subsequent novels matched this. He is nonetheless an author with a wide and loyal readership up there with Julian Barnes and Ian [...]

October 2, 2018 // 0 Comments

The Streets/Anthony Quinn

One of the many joys of writing for The Rust is the collegiate atmosphere. I am no sports buff though I follow the fortunes of West Bromwich Albion and I value the opinions of  Alan (Tanner) Ivan (Conway), Doug (Heath) Rex (Williams) and  Tom (Hollingsworth) on any book I review with a sporting [...]

September 21, 2018 // 0 Comments

Book clubs and The Rehearsal/ Eleanor Catton

I do not like my reading to be prescribed by others and for this reason tend to avoid book clubs. However an erudite and cultivated friend of mine invited me to such a group and I accepted. The book to be discussed was The Rehearsal by Eleanor Carton     her first novel written when she was [...]

September 13, 2018 // 0 Comments

Prague Spring /Simon Mawer

Simon Mawer returns to the historical Czechoslovakian theme of The Glass Room in this novel set in 1968 Prague. It is seen through the prism of two couples: James and Ellie, two university students hitchhiking randomly through Europe, and diplomat Sam Wareham in the British Embassy and his [...]

September 9, 2018 // 0 Comments

The Test/ Nathan Leamon

Nathan Leamon is the  performance analyst of the England cricket team and The Test is his first novel. He writes well on the profile and pressure of the modern Test captain, less so the meaning of life which fills the passages between the description of a gripping test match at Lords. Leamon [...]

August 30, 2018 // 0 Comments

Food for thought

Two aspects of modern life that reoccur in most people’s reflections upon modern life are: Firstly, the various ways we acquire knowledge, keep in touch with what is happening around us and across the world and choose to spend those proportions of our free leisure (or non-working) time that are [...]

August 26, 2018 // 0 Comments

Perhaps a case of not what you do, but what you are

My text for today is a piece by David Barnett upon the process of writing (and specifically ‘writing advice’) that appeared recently – see here for the link – upon the website of – THE INDEPENDENT It’s a worthy read because it has plenty to say, it’s humble and honest and it details [...]

August 8, 2018 // 0 Comments

A Shot in the Dark

Novelist Lynne Truss is an interesting writer. She worked as a sportswriter, wrote an international best seller Eats Shoots and Leaves and has now written this comic detective novel based on her radio plays and set in Brighton in the fifties. It’s not really a homage to Graham Greene’s [...]

August 3, 2018 // 0 Comments

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