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Arts

The price of something – and then its value

Less than a month ago, at private lunch also attended by both the publisher and the editor of The Rust, I was pleased to learn from them that a recently-conducted survey had revealed our arts coverage had registered the highest ‘quality appreciation’ score of all amongst our readership. Here I [...]

October 15, 2018 // 0 Comments

The Housemaid

The cover of the DVD of this 2010 South Korean film advertises it as “a sexy thriller” with star Jeon Do-youn showing her thigh no doubt to entice the punter but in fact it’s a beautifully-observed film which reminded me of Rebecca.  The story is of of a young nanny called Eun- yi (Jeon [...]

October 14, 2018 // 0 Comments

Now you see them – now you don’t …

Okay, I am coming out of the woods with my hands up – I deliberately tuned in yesterday to ITV’s live coverage of the Royal Wedding of Princess Eugenie to Jack Brooksbank in Windsor, more of curiosity than anything else but half-hoping that the crowds would be sparse and that opportunities for [...]

October 13, 2018 // 0 Comments

Bateman House, Burwash

On what may well be the last hot day of this glorious summer extending into autumn, I was delighted to be visiting yesterday Bateman’s, the home of Rudyard Kipling, just east of Lewes which he bought in 1902 for £9,300 which came with 33 acres. At the height of his popularity and fame Kipling [...]

October 11, 2018 // 0 Comments

My art week

Dear old John Pargiter often gives us the lowdown on his sporting week and as there have been three developments in mine I thought I might share them with you. On Monday the ex-cricketer and now artist Jack Russell popped round. I now have three of his works and admire his sense of composition and [...]

October 10, 2018 // 0 Comments

An early ending

At what stage does a disgruntled reader give up on his/her book? It’s an issue that troubles many a book club. Some have rules that provided the member gives a cogent reason he/she can give up. I was guest at one where Saul Bellow novel The Adventures of Argie March was “set”. At least half [...]

October 9, 2018 // 0 Comments

A Good Year/Ridley Scott

Alone for the day as Gail had taken the kids to a distant relative, I wanted to enjoy my freedom with a DVD. A friend had lent me a Pedro Almodovar movie which had rested in my to-be-watched section rather too long. Slightly resentful that I could not watch a semi-erotic French film, I inserted the [...]

October 7, 2018 // 0 Comments

Sir William Orpen

This week in our art course on British art of the twentieth century we covered the First World War artists. Earl Haig by Orpen A war artist was severely constrained, he could not for example paint a dead British soldier and they were clearly regarded by High Command as part of the propaganda [...]

October 4, 2018 // 0 Comments

Paris Echo/Sebastian Faulks

Sebastian Faulks’ Birdsong made a huge impression on me as a First World War novel. It was well researched, moving, with a powerful story. I have never found his subsequent novels matched this. He is nonetheless an author with a wide and loyal readership up there with Julian Barnes and Ian [...]

October 2, 2018 // 0 Comments

Well, whaddya know? Another twist …

Regular and/or chance readers of this organ may remember that yesterday I blogged on the modern era’s spectacular and systematic destruction of the hegemony of what might be termed ‘old style media’ and its replacement with a kaleidoscopic infinite variety of means of social communication and [...]

September 27, 2018 // 0 Comments

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