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Day and Willett triumph

After missing a crucial putt to make the play offs at the Open and collapsing with vertigo at the U.S. Open, Jason triumphed at the Canadian Open. He is the same age as Ricky Fowler and Rory Mcilroy and has a beautiful, lofted swing but is still to win a major. I am sure that day is not a long way off as he fought off the challenge of local lad David Hearn and Bubba Watson by making birdies on the last 3 holes. I had backed Adam Hadwin for a top ten finish at 13-1 which brought some welcome moolah along with Chris Froome winning the King of the Mountains thanks to Guy Danaway.

Danny Willett won his second European title after the Nedbank, earlier and the third of his career. The Yorkshireman has really come on this year and only Justin Rose is ranked higher as an Englishman. Sadly the stars of the last 10 years Luke Donald, Lee Westwood, Graeme McDowell, Ian Poulter are approaching the twilight of their careers , though you never know, so it’s good to see a younger generation of Willetts and Tommy Fleetwood establishing themselves on the Tour.

Last night under much prompting of Rust staff and readers I watched a BBC programme on punters v bookies. My hero Steve Palmer featured but I did not find him or the programme that interesting. We all know that systems ultimately fail, that the bookie just like the market in shares will win. I identified more with the carer who attend Doncaster races with his rather glamorous partner made small but successful bets (two winners at 20-1) just to cover their expenses and have a free day out. The programme did not make its mind as whether it was about punting as a flutter or of earning a living in the case of Steve Palmer. It concentrated too much on the punter’s relations with their partner. Nor was there any reference to football betting or that soccer which takes a high moral stance on racism, sexism and homophobia is quite happy that the FA has a betting partner (their description) in William Hill and betting companies sponsor more Premier shirts than any other business sector.

About John Pargiter

John Pargiter’s biggest claim to fame is his first-ever work experience job, as ‘legs’ (or runner) for Henry Longhurst. For many years he worked in insurance at Lloyds. After retiring he has returned to his favourite sport of golf and is a keen recreational sailor and grandparent. More Posts